Topics: Networking, Red Hat / Linux, Storage

How to install and configure Samba on CentOS 7 for file sharing on Windows

Here's how to set up a secure Samba share from a CentOS 7 (or RHEL 7) system, and share it with a Windows client.

First, install Samba:

# yum install samba samba-client samba-common
Add an exception to the firewall, if the firewall is active:
# firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=public --add-service=samba
# firewall-cmd --reload
Next, you'll need to know the workgroup the Windows system is configured in. By far, the easiest way to do this, is to open a command prompt on the Windows system, and run:
net config workstation
For the sake of this tutorial, we'll assume the workgroup is called WORKGROUP.

Make a copy of the Samba config file:
# cp /etc/samba/smb.conf /etc/samba/smb.conf.orig
Set up a secure file share. In the example below, the share will be located in /media/windows/share on the CentOS 7 system. Be sure to set the permissions in such a way that the user account used for the share (see below) indeed has access to this folder.
# mkdir -p /media/windows/share
# chmod -R 0755 /media/windows/share
# chown -R user:group /media/windows/share
Edit file /etc/samba/smb.conf and add:
[global]
        workgroup = WORKGROUP
        netbios name = centos

[Share]
        comment = Shared Folder
        path = /media/windows/share
        valid users = user
        browsable = yes
        writable = yes
        guest ok = no
        read only = no
Set the SMB passwd for the user (this will be the username and password used to access the share from Windows):
# smbpasswd -a user
New SMB password:
Retype new SMB password:
Make sure everything is okay:
# testparm
Now enable and start Samba:
# systemctl enable smb.service
# systemctl enable nmb.service
# systemctl start smb.service
# systemctl start nmb.service
On the Windows host, io File explore type the IP address of the CentOS system, for example:
\\192.168.0.206
You will be asked for the username and password used when you ran the smbpasswd command.

And that should do it; You should now have a secured Samba share available on a Windows system.

Windows may cache any credentials that are used for the Samba share(s). When configuring the Samba share(s), it may be needed to have Windows "forget" these credentials. This can be easily achieved by running from a Command Prompt:
net use * /del




If you found this useful, here's more on the same topic(s) in our blog:


UNIX Health Check delivers software to scan Linux and AIX systems for potential issues. Run our software on your system, and receive a report in just a few minutes. UNIX Health Check is an automated check list. It will report on perfomance, capacity, stability and security issues. It will alert on configurations that can be improved per best practices, or items that should be improved per audit guidelines. A report will be generated in the format you wish, and the report includes the issues discovered and information on how to solve the issues as well.

Interested in learning more?